Skip to main content

About your Search

20121208
20121208
STATION
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 12:30am PST
that i'm not qualified to talk about, i'm strictly a push to talk guy. we know as a city when the earth moves, things fall, we get a lot of rubble. that's going to be one of our critical, critical things we have to do. we have to be able to move material and personnel and one of the ways we're going to be doing that is how do we actually get the debris off the road so we can put things back to work. so that was the command of control exercise. we had the marine corps, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful year. that's what we did as far as the field exercises. next year i don't know what's next, we're going to explore the lessons learned from this one, we've already learned a bunch, they're going to talk about this shortly then learn what are the next scenarios we can challenge people with. it pr
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 8:30pm PST
uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francis
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 3:00pm PST
welcome to san francisco city hall. i'm supervisor scott wiener. i have the honor of representing district 8 including the castro on the board of supervisors. and which district are formerly represented by harvey milk. supervisor olague likes to remind me we share the district 5 represented by milk. and we're here today to remember supervisor harvey milk and mayor george moscone who were brutally assassinated decades ago. and we gather every year to remember, and not just to remember and to mourn, but also to remember the positives and to remember frankly both of these great men and what they contributed to our community. you know, with respect to harvey milk, there will never, ever be another harvey milk in our community in terms of what he represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in min
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 1:00am PST
mentioned this earlier, we assumed that all of the city's primary communications were online and operational. we used 800 megahertz push to talk radios here. we assumed that system was online and operational and i think next year it would be a really good exercise for us to pull that communications capability out of the picture and use military assets. i think we're going to have a lot of lessons learned out of that activity and it would be a good exercise for the city personnel to understand how they would operate using the military aid. >> i think one of the things that i wrote in my after action report it my boss was about training. we actually have an acu1,000 type capability in pendleton and that is a piece of equipment that bee don't train with routinely the expeditionary folks. i think there is an opportunity in training, it's great when marines get to see the gear and do that type of cross banding we spoke about. civilian authority operates in 700-800 megahertz range. we know fires happen a lot and we're often asked to support so training is a big recommendation i make. >> what i'd r
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 12:00am PST
credible participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 3:30am PST
where most of the activities are taking place in the city. but he's also the president of the board of supervisors. i'd like you to welcome david chiu. (applause) >> glad to have you here. >> glad to be here. good morning. on behalf of the san francisco legislative body, our board of supervisors, i want to welcome you to our city of san francisco. and i first want to also echo what our fire chief just said as far as welcoming all of you who have been serving our country and the world in uniform. i want to thank those of you who helped to run our first responder departments around the bay area. i want to thank those of you who are our volunteers, our note programs here. and of course want to thank and welcome our san francisco secretary of state and the woman who manages and orders around that secretary of state, charles m. charlotte schultz. (applause) >> now, this week as you know, there is a lot going on here. and in addition to welcoming you here at the scenier leader seminar, i want to tell you we were so excited that the sls would be here that we decided this weekend to also re
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 2:30am PST
. response and recovery. and the moderator for this panel is the city administrator for the city and county of san francisco, naomi kelly. please help me welcome naomi kelly. (applause). >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for having me here today. again, i'm naomi kelly, city administrator for the city and county of san francisco and it's an honor to be participating in this important panel discussion on the uss macon island. over the course of the next 50 minutes, we will be going to focus one of our -- we're going to be focused on one of the most important elements of our city and that's the resill yepbs of our life line. i am joined by a prestigious panel of experts who i believe have a keen insight sbat resill yepbs of the capacities we will be relying on heavily in moving forward post a disaster. here with me today is kirk johnson, to my left, vice president of gas transmissions from pacific gas and electric. next to him is don boland, executive director of california utilities emergency association. next to him is david brig, regional and local water system manager for the
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 8:30am PST
have recently been experiencing in the southeastern part of the city. thank you very much, mayor. mayor lee: thank you. i want to also express my appreciation for the other supervisors that are here and also have been engaged with us. certainly, supervisor olague is here. supervisor wiener is here. there is an ongoing discussion about public safety. i also want to express my deep appreciation for our city's cloete community, the interfaith council, and my thanks for today, the pastor and his church and his staff for welcoming us all here in this very integral part of our city and all the other clergy that are here as well as the naacp, represented by a pastor reverend amos brown and his staff, along with the police chief, or public safety clusters, juvenile probation, a deprivation, community-based agencies, city services office, and the number of community groups that have engaged me and my staff and all of the supervisors are on this very serious question around public safety in our city. many of you have known and heard in the past couple of months my very deep concerns about
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 8:00pm PST
hopefully by the end of this week is that we will see more than this symbol. we will see the wishes, that this tree represents for all of us. and that will make this world, with our own decisions, with our own hands, more acceptance, more tolerance, as we wait with great anxiousness on our u.s. supreme court to exhibit their tolerance in our united states for the same-sex marriage that we all deserve. [ applause ] i also wanted to again, acknowledge that this is the season of giving, and hope that you will join us from now to the end of january, and a donation in the city hall when you have to visit, we have canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue doing, is that you have to remember others that are less fortunate, and share our hearts and our minds and our resources with them. and it is just like japan, for what they have done. if you read the papers recently, you know, that japan suffered a very harsh earthquake and tsunami a while back. and they could have easily said, that we are victims of a national disaster. but, when the country heard that the debris was crossing international lines, all the way to the west coast, and they did not claim victim. they also said, we could help. and that is why we heard the news of japan donating $5 million to help the west coast also deal with the debris. that is a wonderful, wonderful gesture of humanitarian work. and so it is my honor tonight, that i stand here with council general inamata welcoming him and the symbol of his country and knowing the origins of the origami and knowing that we have his blessing and his country's blessing, and working with us to make the world better. and create more peace to create tolerance and acceptance for everyone and that this will always improve the quality of life for everyone on this planet. and so, it is with that, that i welcome mr. inamata and the council general of japan here to say a few words before we exchange our blessings to each other as cities and as countries trying to help the world improve. council general >> thank you, mayor, thank you. >> well, good evening, it is my great pleasure to be here, this is the 7th, and the world annual world tree of hope celebrations, here at city hall. and the rainbow world fun and mayor lee. and the san francisco japanese-american community. all arranging this ceremony. this is actually my third time to be here to stage, to say a few words. the first time it was three years ago. and we celebrated the world champions of san francisco giants. and this year, as well. we have many things to celebrate, many things to cherish. including the second time in three years but at the same time, there are lots likes natural disasters. >> in 20 months, have passed since the tsunami in japan. and the theme of tonight, celebration has been one of the essential components of japan's role of habitation and construction. the open of the japanese people and the support of the international community has given our survival. japan is still on its way to recovery. but i wish once again, to thank you for your continued friendship and compassion. thank you very much. [ applause ] , thank you. >> our celebration tonight, demonstrates our community's dedication to this hope for world peace. love, acceptance, and and i hope that we will continue to create a trusting legacy, lasting legacy here in san francisco city hall. as linda mentioned and also the mayor lee said that this is the largest tree of origami so what a beautiful tree we have. for each crane on the tree contains a wish from all over the world. i am optimistic that our hope will grow just like this tree. may we make these wishes come true by allowing the cranes to fly towards their hopes and dreams. thank you, thank you very much and now i would like to exchange cranes with mayor. >> let's hear it for them. >> i see the crowd goes every year for this event and it grows in size and diversity and you are all welcome here and the mayor would reflect those words as well. he loves seeing this diversity and we were laughing at a minute ago what a wonderful thing to have in city hall right here, one person that we forgotten to mention and a lot of this is in our program, take it home, but the tree was donated from the delancy street foundation, get your tree from them. i always try to keep an eye out for an elected officials i did see the fire chief walk in and joanne is here. thank you for being here. and now we are going to go back to our regular program because we have several people who have wishes who have spoken words they want to give to you that kind of express their take on the tree of hope. first of all, mention once before but now hear to speak to you alahandro mahe and teaches at the san francisco university and short story edit tore and award winner and here he is. >> thank you. >> you look fabulous. you remind me of my first girlfriend. only she was not as tall. but, i want to thank the mayor lee, and the mayor's office, and jeff, and world rainbow fund and all of you for the invitation to be here tonight. we are so privileged to be able to gather together in community and joy and celebration and hope while so much of the world is plunged in darkness and chaos and war and intolerance. i am honored to read a poem for you tonight. >> the last time that i tried this, i pulled out a parking ticket. i got lucky this time. in spanish, hope, is aransa. and the plural is suransa many hopes. this is esperansas, in memory of sadako. >> for mother nature, and the ocean. but the rivers and the forest. who will speak for the redwoods and the brisle cones? for the sailors lost at sea, for the eyes that search for them, for the soldier and the soldier's widow. for the one in jail, and for the one that waits for the one in jail. and for the one who never had a chance to speak and found guilty. for the lovers torn apart and for the ones kept apart by, laws and prejudices. for the spare rows and the humming birds and for the weeds and the hararas and for the women of gaza. for the one tortured in the darkness. for the refugees wrapped in barbed wire. for each and every human being who sleeps tonight out in the rain. for shelter, for every human being who sleeps tonight out in the rain. for the child with nostalgia to be born, for every child to get home safe. for the elderly alone, for the worldwide end of hate, disease, and poverty. for a just world still to come, where no one goes hungry and the water is clean. and prisons are outlawed and schools are free. and exciting. and poetry, mandatory. for police and politicians. for the indians of the amazon and for the jaquar faced for extinction and for the battle to stop and for every last gun to be forged into a pen, and for the most hopeless, hopeless in the world, those without even dreams to get by. here there is 100, 10,000 origamis waiting for you, floating in the rainbow of hope >> thank you. >> san francisco poet, that was moving. >> okay we mentioned something called the sisters of perpetual indulgence, if you don't know who they are, any san francisco event who does not have a sister back stage or on stage is not a san francisco event. representing the sisterses of professional indulgence. >> as always, we are so honored to be a part of this magnificent celebration. i would like to also thank my sisters, sister patent leather and sister jaya gamoore and sister may joy in the wings. i would like to start off by making a confession, i have not filled out my wish. and my wish would be i wish donna sasha would give me her necklace, doesn't she look gorgeous? >> maybe dreams, maybe wishes do come true. so, today, we are gathered here in the heart of our city, beneath a symbol of energy and life and hope for the world. you have decorated it with peace cranes and light. wishes and dreams, and most importantly your energy. and now, on behalf of the sisters of perpetual indulgence inc, we gather this energy and strength that we may send it to the nuns above and to give it to any and all that needs its strength. to release the energy of hope that this magnificent tree represents i will ask each and every one of you if you please every time you hear me say we say... you will evoke the words of harvey milk by saying as one group you got to give them hope. now please raise your hands towards the tree of hope and we say you got to give them hope. for all lgbtq young people struggling with bullies and intolerance, we say that you got to give them hope for all transgendered people fighting to live with dignity and respect. we say you got to give them hope. for all of those who seek to protect the rights of lgbtq people across the world, we say you got to give them hope. for our sick and elderly in need of a will having word, a sign of hope, we say, you got to give them hope. each of us gathered here tonight gives witness to the power of hope in our dark world. to you, we say p you got to give them hope. >> to each of us struggling with our own dark places in our hearts, we say, you got to give them hope. i asked each of you as you leave here tonight, a promise, to reach out to at least one person in your life this holiday season, and say, i love you. to give you strength to do so, we say you got to give them hope. now, i will ad lib just a little bit and also to all of those regions that have recently been affected by natural disasters the eastern sea board of the united states and japan and other places in the world we say you got to give them hope. and now, with the energy raised through or from this tree, from the energy raised in our hearts, we seal these blessings and anoint you all with a holy blessing with our love. please administer the glitter. last trouble we got in trouble with housekeeping, so we will do pretend glitter. as it spreads may your love and cheer spread, may it remain on you as long as it is needed and work its way to every part of you that needs magic and light. and now, loudly please, repeat after me. 1, joy, more joy. always joy. and continue to repeat after me, blessed be... this blessed day. tuesday, december 4th, 2012. and as sisters as we always end our blessings, repeat after me, amen, awomen, and all of the others. thank you. and have a beautiful holiday season. [ applause ] >> this is how we celebrate the holidays in san francisco, you are not in kansas any more. let's hear it for the sisters. before we go any further we have one more speaker and some of you have been siping wine, barefoot and bubblely, let's hear it for barefoot and bubblely, afterwards you will be enjoying food was donated by restaurants and asked again and again by so many organization and events and i want to recognize them with lots of enthusiasm, cafe, floor, hot cookies, bomba, garden, and paxis. i am sure that i with missed somebody and before we close out we have one speaker that impersonally looking forward to, this is going to close out the program and at the close of those programs we will do a count down and if you think that tree is pretty now, wait until you see it lit. we are honored to have a special guest tonight, isabel ayunda, the best selling author and considered to be the world's most widely read spanish language author. now there is something her novels, the house of spirit and pola and the city of beasts some of the books have been made into films and inducted into the american academy of arts and letters and received the national literature prize and awarded the literature award and also a writer and humanitarian and how appropriate to have her here, improving the lives of others around the world promoting hope and social justice, honored to have you here and your husband, william gordon, both are here tonight. she will share a message and i will her to do a short count down and i think that we will start at 82. probably ten. please join me in welcoming isabel iyenda. >> thank you, thank you, thank you. i feel like a rat compared to this lady. really, thank you for this invitation. hope, that is the key word for the year to come. not irrational, but realistic optimism, there are many good reasons to be very hopeful. it is time to put our losses and frustrations in a paper bag and burn them. they belong to the past. the new year is like a last stage where we will write our dreams and hopes. what do we hope for? not only jobs, the end of the recession, and a congress that works for a change. let's be greetier. let's hope for a better country, and a safer world. for more compassion. and let's also wish for good fortune for this, our lovely city of san francisco. at the personal level, let's hope for less stress, because the crucial event that determine our life, are beyond our control. and that and good things just happen let's not blame ourselves too harshly when things go wrong. there is usually room for a lot of mistakes and new beginnings. strength comes from overcoming obstacles. that is how we learn and never from our success. we learn from our mistakes. if we are here to end and we do all of the time we just turn around and start again. we all make foolish choices and yet we are here standing, aren't we? we san franciscoans feel entitled to good coffee and permanent happiness. [ applause ] >> i agree with the coffee. but happiness? it is over rated. there is something... there is nothing wrong with struggle, and some pain. if nothing hurts we are dead. all of this wining about the state of the world is so annoying. the world may not be good, but it is certainly better than it was before. this is why i am hopeful never before has humanity had so many resources, knowledge, power, and information. it has never been so interconnected, we are stronger and smarter and we lived longer than our grand parents. it can certainly destroy the planet but probably we will not. we will improve it. because that is what we have been doing since the stone age. we are moving forward and hear in california, we are always a step ahead of everybody else. [ applause ] >> so these are my hopes for the next few months. that we can all have meaningful life. and that we can be close to each other, and participate in our communities, and serve and volunteer. caring for others is cheaper than therapy, it makes a lot of sense and you get to meet nice people. >> i hope that we will be more joyful, creative and playful. that we will have less caution and more passion in matters of the heart. and that we will enjoy sorrowfully this crazy, and extraordinary city of san francisco. when we light this beautiful tree, let's make a wish. let's wish that all of us fall in love with life. thank you. [ applause ] >> i am going to buy one of her books now, i am telling you. >> all right, we are not starting at 82 because i want to see how that tree looks, are they ready upstairs? there is my signal. let's start with 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. happy holidays. isabel. thank you so much for being here and all of the speakers and the people on stage and for coming up with this wonderful idea and if you don't come there won't be a party and so come against next year, my wish that you will ask me to mc this again next year, let's enjoy barefoot bubbly and the restaurants that i listed take your programs home, i'm donna, sachet. thank you. ♪
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 1:30am PST
number of assets, the number of people trained to do these things are. the california national guard has air and land assets that are substantial and can be rapidly deployed to assist the civil responders in their mission to move people, to get things set up, to establish common security. it's a partnership that really needs to happen and is natural. the governor controls the california national guard, he can make forces appear very rapidly in support of a regional disaster, a local emergency or wherever they are needed, and transportation, communication, security logistics capabilities that come to the table really augment the medical care that's being provided in the disaster scene. >> like colonel ingels, i was impressed by the robust, defined chain of command and a large response capable of being produced. however, in an overwhelming disaster things don't always go as planned and certainly our experiences in combat has showed us there and prior experience with disasters have outlined that even though there's a well-defined system of response it doesn't always work out. what i defined yesterday was that logistics problems may get in the way and interfere with medical surge planning as is outlined. putting resources where they are needed in a huge disaster may outstrip the ability of local authorities to do that because roads are out. the niche we have as the marine corps assets we have the ability to locate some of our resources like shock trauma platoons, that's what we do in combat and we have experience with that and that may be something that may be of benefit to this process. >> during the last panel, mr. cahen mentioned it's so important to understand the resources that his agency has versus the ones that the military has and he said at one point they started looking down in terms of typing, i have this, you have this, how are we going to respond and get the resources we need to deal with the incident. i'd like to hear from all of you what did you learn about what the other agencies' capabilities are and how did that open your eyes? >> yesterday we had a great opportunity to look at a variety of resources. in the midst of all the demonstrations that we had, we actually had an hour lecture on dsca, which is pretty incredible to get everything about dsca in one hour. it was a great effort by the folks who do that lecture. to show you how well i listened, i have some take away points on that. the first is that all disasters are local. the folks here in san francisco are going to be in charge from the minute the disaster happens and i think that that's really critical to understand. the local authorities evaluate the situation on the ground and execute what locally is available, then they evaluate shortfalls and what they have and then generate those requirements up through that defined chain of command, as i mentioned earlier. then once those agencies determine what those requirements are, they are given back to the city who employs those as they think they need to be deployed because, again, they are the eyes and understand the local situation. i think going through this that the navy and the marine corps, we're used to being in charge whenever we show up and we're not going to be in this situation. i think it's important for us to understand that and we do and i think we, if we were employed in this certainly would understand that particular chain of command and would be able to fit right in and execute as required by the local situation. >> let me reiterate that the local authorities need to know that the emergency managers, the first responders, are there to be in charge to run things in their local disaster. everyone else that rolls in behind are there to enable them to do that, to manage to get back to normal so all the forces that roll in can finally leave. the emergency managers need to remain in control, they need to be situationally aware, they need to be in communicate with their forces, they need to understand what assets can become available as they need them. again, they are primed, they have to be active and in place and everyone, everything everyone can provide to them, will help in their efforts to contain the disaster and get back to recovery. >> so one of the things that we learned yesterday is the military's very advanced in trauma care and blast injuries and other types of injuries that could happen in a large earthquake. in all planning we also have to consider other populations in san francisco and this was brought up in the hot wash yesterday. san francisco does have elderly populations, they have a lot of vulnerable populations, and we have to figure out if there can be integration with that as well. these are people we deal with on a daily basis and will have health issues in a disaster, especially if they can't get to their primary care doctors or get their education. another thing we took away was a 88 team deployment and a lot of the assets come with teams and they integrate well and how we would get the local teams to integrate with the disaster teams is important as well. i'm glad to hear about the local command and control because i think that would be the expectation, is that we would be requesting these resources to integrate into our local response. >> i think the other thing we lerped is that regardless of the acronym soup that we all speak in, in all of this planning and preparation when it all comes down to it, we all speak medical. when it gets down to actual patient care, we will work together very, very well. we found out about capabilities that are quite flexibility we can use to integrate military and state and national guard capabilities and resources to decompress our emergency departments if that's what the situation is; to offload hospitals that have had their infrastructure impacted that are no longer able to provide care, to provide critical care and just general medical surge for other types of injuries or chronic patients that can't get their needs met through any other means. so it's just a vast array of possible responses. the team i worked with and the other planners really got it when help arrives, they are going to be ready, willing and more than able to help us in the ways that we need. >> yesterday both the marine corps and the california air national guard brought some of their aviation assets and demonstrated those capabilities. miss wilder, earlier on you said game changing was a way to describe that. how do you feel being more aware of those assets and what they can do will affect your planning? >> it really has changed. i can tell you on the bus coming back from the actual exercise event and the exchange event, there were so many discussions about what we can do differently and how we can change our plans so that there are more options, different ways we can look at which hospitals are still standing and what capabilities they have and then how to augment those and supplement with strategic use of state and dod resources. and really looking at how can we make the best possible care system stand and deliver after a catastrophic earthquake. and that was extraordinary. it was really, you know, it changed the perspective. if you understand most hospitals deal with short term emergencies, we have things that happen that are usually 4 to 12 hours in length for the most part except for h1n1, which was so prolonged that it actually was a very different type of response for us. but all the other emergencies that we deal with are usually multi casualty incidents that are very short term in the initial sorting out and triage of those patients and getting them to definitive care. this type of situation requires us it think differently, very trat tee jikly, and plan our resource use and the evolving use of those resources, that it might be a big push for trauma care early on bringing in military assets to provide really strong triage, very clearly defined triage, of who needs what resources immediately and then using whatever we have at each of the hospitals and having that all staged so it's hopefully seamless for the patients that are coming to us needing care. >> doctor. >> i'm going to go back to my earlier theme if we were isolated because the brinks were down, it's great to know that the military has so many assets that can come and help us. one of the things not everybody knows is we only have one heilpad and that's in the va luckily our new mission bay hospital has another one. we have identified sites but it's something to think through. when we are going through our planning and evacuation planning, especially, thinking of all the different sites where patients can be evacuated will be an important planning consideration. but i would like to echo lan's thoughts that this was all exciting to think about and it was received very well. >> anything else, dan? >> as we did on the last panel, that elevator speech, what did you share, what was your big take away that you gave to your boss to say this was why this exercise was important and that take away. >> collaboration is key. jurisdictions need to work with one another, they need to understand who is in charge, what they've got, that goes from city to city, city to county, county to state, state to federal. everyone needs to be working together, understand who the partners are, what arrangement they are going to have for command and control, arrival of assets and things to deal with the local emergencies. things can go back in marin, california, lots of people are going to be rolling in. the time to form relationships and what one another can bring to the table is not when the disaster evolves but in anticipation of it. i think san francisco is doing a great job of getting all the partners together to understand more clearly what they can do with one another and what they can do to deal with an emergency and that just has to happen again and again and again until we are on very good terms with one another from emergency providers, military providers, and what can be brought to bear to deal with a regional emergency. >> i think the real key thing for our take away is we need to do this again and we need to get closer together and do more hands on actual utilization of those assets and start simulating some of the types of things we're talking about doing. you learn so much more when you are actually practicing and working together. so just like the communications exercise, we need to make it more real and really stand side by side and see what kinds of things come up in that environment and how we can work out those gaps. >> yeah, i would agree. i think my take away would be that we should exercise together, small table tops initially and we can always develop larger ones, to really understand the capabilities and further plan and also how integration would work during a big disaster. >> so first i would tell my boss, major general steve, sir, this was a very successful demonstration of our medical surge cape pblt and it was well done. but now we need to evolve and keep moving this forward. what we did on this particular time was stand-alone demonstrations of our particular capabilities. i think the next thing we need to do is a joint demonstration. for example, our shock trauma has many similarities to a dmat that might be a next step in the evolution of this type event. it also, after discussing with several members of the hospitals during the tour yesterday, it's clear that there are many other civilian military training opportunities that exist. those can be maybe collaboration between medical personnel in military and civilian hospitals and many other options like that are possible. >> thank you. for our guests, what questions do you have? again, we have some microphones that can go around, we have two up front. >> very interesting. i have a question, both lewis and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so we can certainly hit the ground running, but then we would need some sort shortly thereafter. >> mine is a two-part question. we've seen in ismat turkey in 1999 a number of walking wounded that will immediately overwhelm the medical response community and then how do you disallow them immediate health care and the specter of reality tv, so that would be the first part, managing expectation in our gold standard health care system. the other part of that response, to maximize the saving of lives, they actually severed limbs in the response process to maximize the safing lives. have we talked about indemnify case of our medical response teams post response? ?oo ?a we did not actually discuss indemnify case or any other legal or even ethical issues on a broader kail. all the hospitals do have plans to handle a surge of patients including a very large number of walking wounded. we assume they will arrive at the hospital starting immediately, even sometimes before the official announcement of a particular incident unless it's an earthquake where we feel the announcement of the incident. but the real key is that those plans will need to be immediately operational so that we can sort out who really does need to come in and get what level of care and that varies by facility, depending on their capabilities, along with hospital lockdown plans to secure the overall physical plant and make sure those capabilities remain intact for all sorts of threats. and the other key piece is dph is an immediate back up to that with the ability to use our clinics and our other partners to stand up potentially alternate care centers and other types of, depeplding on the situation, other types of areas where people can be triaged or get information or get care if necessary. so those plans are in place, we're constantly developing them because we have to really look and we don't have the ability to predesignate every site, after an earthquake we need to make sure each and every site we announce to the public is safe before it's announced so it's a complex type of situation with constant situational awareness that has to be included. >> i just wanted to add on to that, that dph has a great resource of clinics. we are working with our clinics to take on those potentially minor trauma victims that they can treat and offload the hospitals. it would be a matter of triaging them at the hospital level and get them over there. >> just one other key point on that. we would also be working very closely with our partners in dem and the communications sector to really get the word out through our non-emergency informationalized public messaging, whatever it takes to get the message out clearly, even if it's spray painted signage on the signs of buildings, we will get the word out where it is appropriate to go. >> we do have a very defined triage process that we've used in our, on our navy and marine corps side we're quite used to. it would be important to try, that's maybe another training thing we want to work on, that we collaborate and understand we're using the same system because we don't want to create two systems of triage within the city. that's a good way to create more chaos than there might ordinarily be. >> i'd like to follow-up on one of the things that was mentioned about the walking wounded. one of the things that came up after yesterday's after action group was this concept of different patient groups. in the military you have a fairly healthy soldier that you are going to be providing aid to. in san francisco we have young, we have old that have much more complex issues that you may need to deal with. given your capabilities, how would you address that? >> it's a significant concern although it may be a little bit artificial in that we do, our doctors and surgeons and nurses do take care of a wide number of population groups outside of active duty military either at their mtf's or in other previous medical care and disasters we have a experience with a wide range of third world countries and so on. we need to be sensitive on that but i don't believe there's a big training gap that exists in that setting. >> one of the other things that we're doing is also learning from our military partners. the event continues this afternoon with another part of the medical exchange where military subject matter experts are going to be presenting basically a grand rounds of what is new in trauma care from battlefield experience and bringing that to the civilian medical personnel, which this alone is an extraordinary opportunity and what we can do to capitalize on so many of the innovations that have been made in medical care have come from the military and we need to take that and learn from it and see what we can do to improve care over all. >> other questions from our guests? >> i just had a question, as you are moving patients from -- they are entering the facility, they are entering the system and then they start getting handed out and eventually, i suppose, evacuated, did you guys talk about patient records and how you are tracking these patients? >> we did touch on it a bit during the exchange we had at noon. the national system is run through jtap which is a fantastic system and we've seen it in a few of the exercises around. right now the region is doing a feasibility study if jtap would be feasible for us to use and if it is, it would be fantastic. our concern is if it's only used during a sdas ster and it's not used on a daily basis, are you going to have to spend a lot of time training? it's not really hard to use but there are some complexities with it. so it is a big job in the city tracking patient movement and we are addressing it. and i think we're waiting for the feasibility study to kind of determine what our next step would be. >> i think there was another question here. yes. >> yes, we know from hsda studies that for a very large earthquake you can expect perhaps tens of thousands of individuals that will need hospital treatment and hospitals are generally fairly full anyway. was there any discussion of altered standards of care during your workshops? >> not during the workshop specifically but it is something we've discussed at our hospital council group on and off and it is something the counseling association of hospitals is working on as well. i think we have to think as a group locally what type of policy we would want to have. i don't know that we'd have an alternate standard but we might have a policy if there was a huge medical surge event what kind of standards we would be willing to accept and that would be working on in conjunction with all of our partners. >> that's probably one of the most difficult and controversial subjects in disaster medical response right now because it can be so difficultment until you are there in the situation and know exactly what resources you have and what your capabilities are day by day it really will change so much. so that's why bringing in partners early to offload and shift where we can provide care will make a huge difference. we don't ever want to see providers making the kind of decisions that had to be made during katrina and other events. instead of having a set standard of care, even if it's an altered or austere standard of care, what we want to have is good decision framework. until you are in the situation you can't determine what you would actually be doing and what resources are still available. >> do we have other questions from our audience? one final question and this is for our civilians. you got to see all kinds of cool stuff yesterday down at moffat's field. i want to see if there's one or two that stuck out. >> i think the c130 definitely blew me away, the fact it can transport 92 people, patients, was incredible. the other 1 that stands out is the mobile decon patient, that it can decontaminate a patient that was not able to stand. >> the team from the hospital that i was with and the other hospitals really looked at what were their hands on capabilities and some of the things that stood out the most is a portable oxygen generator that sits in the corner of the shock trauma platoon unit and doesn't have to be hooked up to our large liquid oxygen tanks and all that piping that might get disrupted during a major seismic event. having something just that simple could make a huge difference. maybe we were thinking small but just really direct hablds on patient care, there was a portable iv pump and fluid warmer that literally would fit in your hand and is battery powered. anything that's portable and is battery powered will make a huge difference in the type of disasters we're facing. we can leave it with the patient, move it with the patient, i know they have a whole list of other things they want and we have to take a lack at that and see what we can actually do. >> i do have one question and it deals with licensing. we're going to have physicians performing medical operations and they aren't licensed in the state, does that present any kind of issue for the emergency response? >> so the state of california has the disaster health volunteer system. and you can sign up on there and they will look at the credentials within 24 hours and say if -- that's the extent, though, they don't do any background checks. so the locals have to kind of develop their own policies and again that is something we're working on. we have a lot of great doctors and nurses in san francisco and knowing they would be willing to respond in case of a disaster is important. capturing that information on dhv and know they would be able to go to other facilities if need be is one of our big to do items. >> each hospital is also required to have a whole plan for credentialing volunteer medical professionals, both those who are licensed independent practitioners and those who have either certifications or other non-licensed kind of health care practitioners and a whole way to integrate them into their response if necessary. it's part of the joint commission standards for hospitals in planning for emergency response as well. >> the military has no problem, then, your shock trauma platoon comes in and you have medical personnel, i guess i was aiming at the military side. if we have (inaudible) does that apply to the military. >> many of them who serve in california are not licensed in california, the military has a waiver for that requirement. so i'm not certain how that would apply if we're using those folks in a humanitarian disaster in california. we're able to treat our folks regardless of the state of licensing in a particular state, though. >> last year when i took a look at the shock trauma platoon, and i'm going to talk to you about that one really cool thing i saw. i have a little bit of medical experience and to see they have effectively a robotic soldier that can go into defib, whose eyes can dilate, they can do pulses both radial and distal and there is a programmer who is effectively testing a battlefield soldier what to do, i found absolutely fascinating as a way to bring a real life experience to that individual. for me that was a fantastic tool that you have and i thought that was wonderful. >> we're going to be -- little advertisement -- we're going to be demonstrating that capability at our display at the marina green so if you'd like to come see that, that's available. >>
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 2:00am PST
system, and you do, one that the cities and counties and states should be proud of. because they get it. they get it out here. but the hospitals, they will have to figure it out. but what if you are a country and all of a sudden you have an earthquake and by the way the one thing you need most because of that earthquake, the hospital infrastructure, is gone. can we describe a scenario that could be like that? i remember when i was in college a popular thing was the national lampoon and they did a parody of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the wo
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 3:30pm PST
and he touches john's heart and then he moves away towards the city hall of john's memory and john set the stairs in the way that george did, cocky and sexy, cruel as all get out. and then the song ends. and i notice the woman sitting next to me crying. and after the play is over, after the standing ovation of tony's brave and beautiful play, as people start to leave the theater, this woman, she remains in her chair and it seems she cannot move. i gently asked her if she's all right. and she nods. and she says without looking at me because she couldn't look at me, "i got to see my mayor again." so, maybe through art we can see again. about a month ago i braved going to the sf moment to check out the infamous bust of my dad and all i could remember growing up were the images of that controversial pedestal of gunshots and twinkies and don't think i didn't smile when i heard hostess went under. [laughter] (applause) but when i went to see the bust for that first time, a bust that i have to admit captured george's mile wide grin and dramatically imperfect teeth, i saw on the pedestal s
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 5:00am PST
as a city, as a community, what can we do to help you? and the answer was, you know, we really need equipment. i said, all right, well, i can see what i can do, there's a couple networks. and what we really would like is a way to help the community because as you've heard mentioned here a few times, this idea of post traumatic stress, it was prevalent. you can feel it. people were -- this was a month or so, two months after. every time there was an aftershock people were on edge. we were on edge, for crying out loud. we're wandering around under this rubble, i'm looking back at these pictures now and thinking, what am i, an idiot? these buildings are going to come down. if you look at these pictures commerce is taking place under it where in america they would close down the block. this where my family has always had its stall. we got to make a living. what else can we do? we don't have any medical training which kind of -- okay, you are fire fighters, i figured you had some. that was my naivete at the moment, i think i was a little overwhelmed myself. that's still my on-going proje
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 1:00pm PST
that you habe inthe city hall in this one rotunda or one of the offices and so many wonderful weddings and so many celebrations and so many heart rending speeches and yes, some sad occasionstoo. all a part of our community and our beautiful city. as yolook around this room tonight, what a diverse combination we have. it makes me smile, but it probably doesn't make nebraska smile. we live in a richly diverse city and our elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and i just have to go slo
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 4:00am PST
august when we did our exercise with the city. fema is well represented and we have several defense coordinating officers here over the past couple of days. certainly the california national guard is represented heavily here. obviously they are going to be the first guys to respond to a disaster and they have several interesting roles not only from a state perspective but as they get federalized or with the dual status commander managing federal response and federal authorities of military authorities flowing in. and most significantly, we're represented today with the commander of northern command, general jackoby. as you know, defense report to civil authorities is not a primary mission area for the department of defense. we have codified it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't te
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 3:00am PST
get to. in fact, we suffered tlie that in a lot of the big cities just even during commute times if there's a minor emergency getting tlau and we have a relationship with the city here in san francisco where the fire department and the first responders have reached out to us and will help us get there. i can't say we have that everywhere in our state. certainly in a major event, that would be our concern, our ability to get our work force into the bay area given the type of infrastructure we have here. >> thank you. mr. brig. >> i would add, we don't have aircraft that can lift heavy bull dozers so we would be looking to the state for that. that would be a mutual aid call pretty quick. >> verizon wireless would be the same. the most important thing is for us to get our resources where they need to work where they can repair or reroute traffic where it needs to be. one of our main offices is located in the south bay. that way we don't have to worry about bridge access to get into the peninsula or san francisco if the situation occurs, but if the situation does occur, we're going it n
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 11:00pm PST
, family, and friends will really enjoy. >> i am here with a manager at the heart of the city farmer's market in san francisco. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about the organization. >> we're 30 years old now. we started with 14 farmers, and it has grown out to over 80. >> what is the mission of the organization? >> this area has no grocery store spiller it is all mom-and- pop stores. we have this because it is needed. we knew it was needed. and the plaza needed somebody. it was empty. beautiful with city hall in the background. >> thank you for speaking with us. are you on the web? >> yes, hocfarmersmarket.org. >> check them out. thank you. >> welcome. the dish is ready. >> it looks and smells amazing. >> thank you. it was not easy to meet the $20 budget. i checked everybody out and found some great produce. really lovely seafood. i think that you are going to love it. >> do not be shy. cyou know this can run you $35 to $45 for a bowl, so it is great you did this for $20. >> this will feed four to six people. >> not if you invite me over for dinner. i am ready to dig i
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 9:30pm PST
, great honor to be here in city hall of san francisco. the person that nominated me for this award is laverne roberts. maybe some of you knew her as laverne morrisy. she went home to her reservation. she is piute and went to her home. where is her home? >> [inaudible] >> in earring ton nevada. we went there once and she has a beautiful house and live there is and now she is even running for the council of her tribe. laverne was going to surprise me and be here this evening, but she had an outbreak of one of her illnesses. her foot started to bleed and now she has to be on crutches for a while, so she had to turn in her plane ticket and her taxi fare, but otherwise she would have been here tonight and many of us know laverne and we would like to say a prayer that she gets better soon and can come and see us. this is for laverne. yes. please let's clap our hands for laverne. [applause] >> thank you. laverne roberts was honored here in this space two years ago. thank you laverne. and i think i can say a lot more about being indian and how much i am proud to be indian. i did work in th
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 6:30pm PST
the country help to organize recovery month community events and celebrations in september, in cities and towns across the nation. these events bring together the courageous people in recovery, the caring service providers that work tirelessly to support people in recovery, and the family and friends who are so vital in making recovery a reality. this year, the efforts of thousands of individuals throughout the country produce more than a thousand events nationwide, supporting our 2011 theme, "join the voices for recovery. recovery benefits everyone." these recovery month events confirm that we are making great progress in building strong recovery communities. for everyone to be successful over the long run, we must support people in recovery, not only with our encouraging words but also with housing, education, and employment. recovery month events make the faces of recovery visible in the community, highlighting the fact that people in recovery are our family members, friends, and neighbors. and it underscores the need for ongoing support for those who have beat addiction and mental
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 4:30am PST
this all the time. so it seems a little bit of a one-off for a city to be involved. but when i say it's a story of people and a story of community, it really does start right there. last halloween, so we're talking on the eve of -- in the aftermath of fleet week, as it were, october is a really busy month for us here in san francisco. it starts off with fleet week and it ends with halloween so it's two cresendo events. last halloween diana who you see running around here, key to the organization, who does most of the logistics to make this happen, and i went to get dinner at a local establishment. it's called hays and kabob and we went to get dinner on our way to the operations center hoping nobody would celebrate too much so we could get out of there at a decent hour. when we went there, we were both in our black eem polos and we started talking to the owner and he said, oh, did you hear about the earthquake in turkey? well, we'd heard about it the way everybody heard about it, i think it got about two minutes on some of the cable news channels, and that was it. there wasn't a lot
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 7:00am PST
all the young adults. absolutely. yelling back here, [ applause ] . that was our deputy city librarian, what can we say? a wonderful space for children. this north beach library serves over 30,000 diverse residents and it's way overdue to have a state-of-the-art library. clean it's really a true partnership with our city departments and i want to thank our dpw folks and their team. mindy, lena, fantastic work in managing this project. [ applause ] and another superb partner in phil ginsburg, rec and park, thank you. [ applause ] this is going to be an amazing space that ties together the joe dimaggio park and you will hear more about that. it's wonderful to know that it really creates an amazing civic space for north beach and it wouldn't happen wouldn't fantastic support from the community. julie christinsen, a shout out to you. [ applause ] the. so throughout this ceremony, we're going to celebrate and pay tribute to all of the wonderful folks that are making it happen. so without further ado, person that not only has prior director of public works, city administrator and n
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 10:30pm PST
link to the sf approved list which is sf approved list .org because san francisco passed the nation's first precautionary purchasing ordinance which means that in the ideal, product that is are safer are what's purchased for all city institutions and city agencies and offices, so this approved list has the list of like light bulbs and commuters and cleaning products and stuff like that, toilet paper, you know, that are either less toxic or less straining of resources and so that approved list can be one of the tools that you can use in fire houses, in this office, probably a lot of that's already happening, and across all of san francisco offices and agencies. so, any ideas before we open for questions about little things in the fire houses that you would want to see happen or commitments that you can make in those spaces? yes? >> [inaudible]. i probably don't need a microphone, but -- >> they need it. >> maybe i need to turn it on. it's on. can you hear me? okay. janet, as articulated by a couple of people already, one of our issues is diesel exhausts in the fire houses and
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 1:30pm PST
heroshi, imamata. >> happy holidays everyone, welcome to the great city of san francisco, that dress, donna will make santa claus stay up all night. any way, i want to welcome everybody again to city hall, and to view our wonderful, wonderful tree of hope. it is something that i enjoy every year that it has been here and i tell you when it was announced that this was the tallest, largest tree of hope in the united states, if not in the world, i also wanted to say my very first thought was san francisco has always the biggest hearts in the world, thanks to all of you. thank you, donna, for your wonderful mc work here every year. and your beautiful presence. jeff carter, thank you very much, congratulations and thank you on behalf of everyone in the city, we are so proud of your work. karin that i have known for 30 years, thank you for you and all of the volunteers from the rainbow fund to put this together to place all of these 10,000 ornaments on the tree to give us the kind of attention that we would like not just because we have a great tree or city hall, but because we do always w
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 9:00am PST
an entire city to get them across the high-school finish line. if we can do that, all those other numbers go away. think about the money that could be productively spent towards ending violence in the long-term here in san francisco. i cannot tell you how much i appreciate the mayor and the board of supervisors' leadership and the friendship and love that is in the room. we really, really appreciate the help. thank you. [applause] >> next, we will be bringing up the director of adult probation, chief windy still -- wendy still. [applause] >> thank you. adult probation department is working to create short and long term effective intervention to provide offenders with meaningful opportunities to change their lives, which will also reduce crime and victimization. we have to create a way out. our public safety and community-based organization partnership will include a continuum of employment, education, housing, mental health services that will enable individuals to break the -- break free from violence and long-term seminal behavior disrupting the into generational cycle of crime.
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 9:00pm PST
to thank the city of san francisco for hosting this event. -- plawz. thank you. this is really quite a beautiful space and honor to be standing at the base of the stair case and this incredible rotunda and i want to thank the dancers and singers and drummers for sharing their heritage with us and just adds to this special event and be sure to tune in through november. thanks. [applause] >> all right. thank you michael and i would like to call to the stage at this time mr. joaquin torres the director of neighborhood service from the mayor's office. good to see you again. [applause] >> well, good evening everyone and just to reaffirm on behalf of mayor lee it's a pleasure to have you here tonight in city hall, our humble abode. to all of the musicians and performers and nice to bring life into sometimes these cold walls and we we can. kqud and to all of you for coming out of the studio and brings your presence into here city hall. i know the broadcasting world is happy from the election results last night and we can continue to deliver programming for our communities. [applause]
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 6:00am PST
provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfer that to an air to air victor frequency. but from a command control perspective, we're fairly robust. are we perfect, no, but we
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 12:30pm PST
outside. so, when people are walking around the city they can actually see the green and environmental aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen, we are performing excerpts from composer naverez, our christmas, and our soloist tonight is
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 2:30pm PST
city's general fund. >> 4. 3. 2. 1. [applause] >> the playground is broken into three general areas. one for the preschool set, another for older
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 10:30am PST
? >> behind the city, behind the houses, behind those hills. the see any more hills? >> these kids are wonderful. they get to explore, they get to see different things. >> we let them explore a little bit. they get their best. if their parents ever ask, we can learn -- they can say that they learned about the depth of field or the rule of thirds or that the shadows can give a good contrast. some of the things they come up with are fantastic. that is what we're trying to encourage. these kids can bring up the creativity and also the love for photography. >> a lot of people come into my classes and they don't feel like they really are creative and through the process of working and showing them and giving them some tips and ideas. >> this is kind of the best kept secret. you should come on and take a class. we have orientations on most saturdays. this is a really wonderful location and is the real jewel to the community. >> ready to develop your photography skills? the harvey milk photo center focuses on adult classes. andsa
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 11:30pm PST
are many streets of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san francisco. these are names we should never forget. we'll see another names as they serve our great city and become our great local heroes. many of these names now on this very wonderful interactive board. tonight celebrate. celebrate the whole month and make sure we remember our heroes and make sure we honor the c
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 7:30am PST
. mindy, lenu chen, the manager for the project. michael from planning, john from the city attorney's office. michelle and mary, michelle is with the library and mary is with the friends of the library and put on this event today. our commissioners, rec and park, planning, library, who have voted unanimously. some of them more than once for this project. our board of supervisors, who stood with us. the architects, marsha and a special thanks to erin who has done so much to help us on though this project. you know? that is the city side of this public-private partnership and i have to be fair in saying that this project has lasted through the term of two supervisors, two head librarians, three mayors, and four rec and park general managers. the heart of this project, the constant thing has been the heart of this neighborhood. has been our volunteers and our people. [ applause ] >> so i want to introduce june. [ applause ] , liz diaz. amy miles. bill collins. martha mahoney, who also does our halloween. terry. i saved lizzy. this is lizzy hirsch. she has been there. one of the founders
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 7:00pm PST
boys chorus, let's hear it for them. [ applause ] >> watch how disciplined they are leaving the stage too. if all kids were like that, maybe i would have one. >> it is going to be a great ceremony at city hall, look around, if you have been here you know what a beautiful honored spot we are in, if you have never been to this city hall, it is yours, come by some times, there are meetings going on and business happening but also celebrations of all kinds. tonight is one of those celebrations, we are going to be lighting the tree here at the top here. the beautiful tree of hope. and we have some more entertainment for you before we get to the program and a little bit more music and some of you are mildly singing along. no minds if you sing along as long as you know the words and sing. >> tammy hall, an accomplished key board artist and she is going to play for a little bit. tammy hall, everyone. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] . >> no wonder she is all over town, tammy hall on the electric piano. and let's add another mix to it, and we have a very talented vocalist who is also eve
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)